Archery terminology

Archery terminology

Anchor Finger Tab

Ankertab

A finger tab or archer tab is a small leather or synthetic patch that protects an archer's fingers from the bowstring. It is strapped or otherwise attached to an archer's hand. With or without adjustable chin plate and a adjustable finger spacer.

Anchor point

Ankerpunt

A point to be touched by the draw hand or string when the bow is fully drawn and ready to shoot, usually a point on the archer's mouth, chin or nose

Archer ‘s paradox

Archer ‘s paradox

The effect produced by an arrow flexing as it leaves the bow

Clout Archery

Clout schieten

A discipline in archery to shoot at a flag. The closer arrow scores maximum points. Distance to the target up to 180 Yards - 164,59 Meter

Cock feather

Haneveer

Name for shaft feather which is away from the bow.

Draw length

Treklengte

Individual measure. At full draw the distance in inches from nock point on bow string to deepest grip spot (pivot-point) plus 1 3⁄4 inches (44 mm) (AMO standard).

Field Archery

Veld en Jacht

Target archery − From different distances, shooting a steady targets in a forest, uphill, downhill. Arrowhead, field rounds are in a 24 Targets course. There is a different in target sizes and distances at the WA World Archery Federation and the IFAA International Field Archery Association

Finger Tab

Vingerleer

A finger tab or archer tab is a small leather or synthetic patch that protects an archer's fingers from the bowstring. It is strapped or otherwise attached to an archer's hand.

Flu-flu arrow

Flu-flu arrow

A flu-flu arrow is a type of arrow specifically designed to travel a short distance. Such arrows are particularly useful when shooting at aerial targets or for certain types of recreational archery where the arrow must not travel too far. One of the main uses of these arrows is that they do not get lost as easily if they miss the target. A flu-flu is a design of fletching, normally made by using long sections of feathers; in most cases six or more sections are used, rather than the traditional three. Alternatively, two long feathers can be spiraled around the end of the arrow shaft. In either case, the excessive fletching serves to generate more drag and slow the arrow down rapidly after a short distance (about 30 m or 33 yards). Recreational flu-flus usually have rubber points to add weight and keep the flight slower.

Footed arrow

Ingelegde pijl

A footed wooden arrow is an arrow with a hard wood point end which is called a footing. They can be spliced in several ways. Either a single, two wing or four wing footing splice and several varieties of hard woods with purpleheart being the most common.

GPI

GPI

The weight of an arrow shaft can be expressed in GPI (grains per inch). This does not include the other elements of a finished arrow, so a complete arrow will be heavier than the shaft alone.

Handle

Middenstuk

The handle section of a bow

Hankyu

Hankyu

A short Japanese bow

Hen feather

kippeveer-Hen

Name for the 2 feathers which contact the bow.

Horseback archer

An archer riding a horse.

Inch

Inch

25.4 mm. Used to measure the draw length and the arrow length

Kisser

Kisser

A button used to indicate consistent vertical distance when drawing a bow

Limbs

Latten

Lower and upper arms of a bow. Take down with screws, ILF system and the Formula system are the most common in archery.

Longbow

Longbow

A tall wooden bow with a D shaped cross-section, approximately the same height as the archer, without significant recurve

Nocking point

Nokpunt

The point on a bow string over which an arrow nock is placed

Overdraw

overdraw

The use of a device, e.g. a siper, to allow the shooting of arrows shorter than the draw of the bow

Plunger or pressure button

Drukpunt / Button

A device used to correct an arrow's flex at the point of release

Riser

Middenstuk

The handle section of a bow

Spine

Spine

ATA (AMO) is the Archery Trade Association, formerly the Archery Manufacturers and Merchants Organization. When they measure the arrow spine, they record the deflection in thousandths of an inch. An arrow is attached to two supports, 26 inches apart, and pressed in the middle with a weight of 2 pounds (907 grams). A deflection in the arrow of 0.4 inches gives an arrow spine of 400. The arrow spines of wooden arrows are measured according to the ATA system.
ASTM is the American Society for Testing and Materials. In their Test Nr. F2031-05, they record the deflection in thousandths of an inch. In this test, an arrow is attached to two supports, 28 inches apart, and pressed in the middle with a weight of 1.94 pounds (880 grams). The weight is smaller, but the distance between the supports is greater, which should give a similar deflection. Arrow spines of carbon fiber and aluminum shafts are specified according to the “modern” ASTM standard.

Target Archery

Doelschieten

From different distances, shooting a steady targets in a open field.

Yumi

Yumi

Yumi (弓) is the Japanese term for a bow. As used in English, yumi refers more specifically to traditional Japanese asymmetrical bows, and includes the longer daikyū (大弓) and the shorter hankyū (半弓) used in the practice of kyūdō and kyūjutsu, or Japanese archery. The yumi was an important weapon of the samurai warrior during the feudal period of Japan. It shoots Japanese arrows called ya.

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Johan van Dongen
CEO
Archery Service Center